Guest Post with Giveaway ~ Addressed To Kill by Jean Flowers

One Degree of Separation from Reading

A frequent question at panel discussions and bookstore events is What one book would you take to a deserted island?

I heard Margaret Atwood answer the question during an interview a few years ago: "Only one book? I'd take the biggest book I could find," she said.

Same here!

But apart from that unrealistic "what if," I'm what you might call a heavy reader—3 book clubs and always a full e-reader. But for some reason, none of my four main protagonists are readers.

I'm not sure why no one in my gallery of characters is even a light reader. They confine themselves to literature that's pertinent to their jobs or interests, almost never including fiction or reading for relaxation. Nor do they ever discuss books, a favorite pastime of mine.

Here's the lineup and their reading habits:

• Dr. Gloria Lamerino, retired physicist, reads Physics Today, Scientific American, assorted technical papers, and The New Yorker cartoons. That's it.

• Geraldine Porter, retired English teacher and miniaturist, often quotes Shakespeare, but not once in nine books has she picked up a volume and had a quiet read. She does occasionally leaf through a miniatures or crafts magazine.

• Professor Sophie Knowles, college math teacher, reads and contributes to mathematics journals and puzzle magazines. No fiction.

Finally, with my 4th series, I might have a reader.

• Cassie Miller (ADDRESSED TO KILL, July 2017), postmaster in a small Massachusetts town, reads crime fiction. Though I don't give specific titles, I do have Cassie commenting on certain plot devices, and actually trying to read crime novels before bedtime. Granted she's quickly distracted and turns to focusing on "the case" at hand.

One reason my amateur sleuths don't read: they're very busy people! In general, they solve a murder case in a week or so, sometimes sooner. That's pretty quick, considering real cops sometimes take months, often years. I think this is typical of amateur sleuths—they crowd more into one day than the clichéd one-armed paper hanger, maintaining jobs, snooping around crime scenes and suspects' desks, and sometimes juggling children on their hips.

Also, reading is very passive, as opposed to, say, a car chase, a shoot-out, or even a quiet stalking scene. It's hard to make a reading scene exciting.

She stretched out on the couch, put on her reading glasses, picked up a book, found the bookmark, opened the book,  . . .

See what I mean?

Here's a twist on this topic. A few years ago, a book by Bay Area screenwriter and true crime writer, James Dalessandro, was made into a movie for TV. In one scene, Jane's Aunt Gertrude is pictured sitting comfortably, reading. Her book of choice: my first release, a hardback copy of The Hydrogen Murder. She holds it up, the turquoise cover visible, plain as day.

Suddenly an intruder breaks in and murders her!

The book falls out of her hands and onto the floor, cover side up, immortalized as part of the crime scene. Later in the show, crime scene photos show the book as it lay on the floor near Aunt Gertrude's feet.

So, although my characters aren't reading, someone is reading my characters!

Guest post provided by the publisher.

Series: A Postmistress Mystery (Book 3)
Publisher: Berkley (July 25, 2017)
Genre: Cozy Mystery
ISBN-10: 042527912X
ISBN-13: 978-0425279120
ASIN: B01M8PU7NR
Buy: Amazon, Kindle, IndieBound, The Book Depository

addressed-to-kill

Third in the Postmistress Mystery series by Jean Flowers, following Death Takes Priority and Cancelled by Murder…

Love is in the air for postmaster Cassie Miller and the residents of North Ashcot, Massachusetts. Valentine's Day is right around the corner, and the town is gearing up for a special dinner dance at the senior center. With the local musical group performing at the dance displaced from their regular practice location, Cassie is all too happy to host them during off-hours at the post office.

But not everything is coming up roses. When one of the musicians, Dennis Somerville, is found shot in his home, rumors swirl over who might have wanted him dead. Cassie must determine if there is a link between a string of recent break-ins and Dennis's murder before another victim winds up with more than a broken heart.

Thanks to the publisher I have one (1) copy of Addressed to Kill to give away.

Giveaway open to residents of the US only.
Giveaway ends on August 13th


a Rafflecopter giveaway

Winner will have 48 hours from the time of notification to confirm their win or another winner will be chosen.

Jean Flowers is the pseudonym for Camillel Minichino, who has published eight novels in the Periodic Table Mysteries, featuring retired physicist Gloria Lamerino. The series continues in short stories on Kindle and Smashwords.com.  The latest is a re-issue of The Hydrogen Murder on Kindle.

 As Margaret Grace, she’s published six novels in the Miniature Mysteries series, featuring miniaturist Geraldine Porter and her 11-year-old granddaughter, Maddie. The latest is Mix-Up in Miniature.

As Ada Madison she’s published two novels in the Professor Sophie Knowles Mysteries, featuring college professor Sophie Knowles.

Camille received her Ph.D. in physics from Fordham University, New York City. She is currently on faculty of Golden Gate University, in San Francisco and on the staff of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Camille is on the board of NorCal Sisters in Crime. She’s a member of NorCal Mystery Writers of America and the California Writers Club.

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Comments

  1. Hi Lori and all your readers! Thanks for having me here today. I hope everyone is looking forward to a great Sunday!

  2. Karley Moore says:

    Thanks for the giveaway!!!

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